Immigration

Whether someone arrives as a refugee, migrant worker, international student or permanent resident, they add to the social, cultural and economic fabric of the province.  The majority of immigrants and refugees who come to New Brunswick do not settle here.  A Green government would:  

  • provide all newcomer services at one location in at least six geographical regions.  Not only is this a more economically sound model, but also allows for the centralization of expertise and a higher chance of newcomer integration and success;

  • conduct a review of the Foreign Qualification Recognition Funding Program and other measures in place for the recognition of foreign credentials to ensure that proper measures and supports are in place to give newcomers the recognition they deserve; 

  • increase access to full-time translators, psychological and social services, as needed, for refugee children in the public school system;

  • ensure that teachers, doctors and public servants, often the first line of communication and support for refugees and immigrants, are adequately prepared for their challenges by, among other things, preparing and delivering workshops on cultural sensitivity;

  • provide dedicated funding to allow the New Brunswick Refugee Clinic to expand and remain sustainable, and encourage and support the addition of more legal services for immigration law;  

  • initiate an educational campaign, with advertisements and materials distributed through public offices and schools, to support increased immigration and to undermine the myths against immigration and refugees; 

  • put pressure on the federal government to suspend the Safe Third Country Agreement; abolish the list of Designated Countries of Origin, which delegitimizes claims from those countries because they are considered “safe”; and increase the target for refugee intake to well beyond the target of 40,000; and

  • ease the availability of the Provincial Nominee Program for Temporary Foreign Workers as way to directly provide a pathway to permanent residency.

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Our Principles

> Non-Violence

A culture of cooperation, caring and understanding is essential to ending violence in our society. Rehabilitation rather than vengeance must be the goal of our justice system.

> Self-Determination and Citizenship

We must have the opportunity and the responsibility as citizens to contribute to the common good, which requires that all have the capacity to participate in community life.

> Social Justice and Equality

Everyone must have equal access to the necessities of life and be treated with dignity and respect. Treaties with First Nations must be honoured.

> Participatory Democracy

We must be able to participate in decisions that affect our lives and be guaranteed that our votes are reflected in the make-up of the Legislative Assembly.

> Local Self-Reliance

Our communities should be in control of their own destinies, supported by strong local economies, and sustained by local sources of food and renewable energy.

> Living within Our Ecological Means

We must live within the ecological limits of the Earth, while meeting our needs without threatening our children's future or the survival of other species.

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